The personality of popular facebook users

D. Quercia, J. Crowcroft, R. Lambiotte, D. Stillwell, M. Kosinski

Résultats de recherche: Contribution dans un livre/un catalogue/un rapport/dans les actes d'une conférenceArticle dans les actes d'une conférence/un colloque

Résumé

We study the relationship between Facebook popularity (number of contacts) and personality traits on a large number of subjects. We test to which extent two prevalent viewpoints hold. That is, popular users (those with many social contacts) are the ones whose personality traits either predict many offline (real world) friends or predict propensity to maintain superficial relationships. We find that the predictor for number of friends in the real world (Extraversion) is also a predictor for number of Facebook contacts. We then test whether people who have many social contacts on Facebook are the ones who are able to adapt themselves to new forms of communication, present themselves in likable ways, and have propensity to maintain superficial relationships. We show that there is no statistical evidence to support such a conjecture. © 2012 ACM.
langue originaleAnglais
titreProceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW
Pages955-964
Nombre de pages10
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 1 janv. 2012

Empreinte digitale

Facebook
Predictors
Personality traits
Propensity
Extraversion
Communication

Citer ceci

Quercia, D., Crowcroft, J., Lambiotte, R., Stillwell, D., & Kosinski, M. (2012). The personality of popular facebook users. Dans Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW (p. 955-964) https://doi.org/10.1145/2145204.2145346
Quercia, D. ; Crowcroft, J. ; Lambiotte, R. ; Stillwell, D. ; Kosinski, M. / The personality of popular facebook users. Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. 2012. p. 955-964
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Quercia, D, Crowcroft, J, Lambiotte, R, Stillwell, D & Kosinski, M 2012, The personality of popular facebook users. Dans Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. p. 955-964. https://doi.org/10.1145/2145204.2145346

The personality of popular facebook users. / Quercia, D.; Crowcroft, J.; Lambiotte, R.; Stillwell, D.; Kosinski, M.

Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. 2012. p. 955-964.

Résultats de recherche: Contribution dans un livre/un catalogue/un rapport/dans les actes d'une conférenceArticle dans les actes d'une conférence/un colloque

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Quercia D, Crowcroft J, Lambiotte R, Stillwell D, Kosinski M. The personality of popular facebook users. Dans Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work, CSCW. 2012. p. 955-964 https://doi.org/10.1145/2145204.2145346