Species interactions and chemical stress: Combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene on Daphnia magna population dynamics

Karel P J Viaene, Frederik De Laender, Andreu Rico, Paul J. Van den Brink, Antonio Di Guardo, Melissa Morselli, Colin R. Janssen

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

Résumé

Species interactions are often suggested as an important factor when assessing the effects of chemicals on higher levels of biological organization. Nevertheless, the contribution of intraspecific and interspecific interactions to chemical effects on populations is often overlooked. In the present study, Daphnia magna populations were initiated with different levels of intraspecific competition, interspecific competition, and predation and exposed to pyrene pulses. Generalized linear models were used to test which of these factors significantly explained population size and structure at different time points. Pyrene had a negative effect on total population densities, with effects being more pronounced on smaller D. magna individuals. Among all species interactions tested, predation had the largest negative effect on population densities. Predation and high initial intraspecific competition were shown to interact antagonistically with pyrene exposure. This was attributed to differences in population structure before pyrene exposure and pyrene-induced reductions in predation pressure by Chaoborus sp. larvae. The present study provides empirical evidence that species interactions within and between populations can alter the response of aquatic populations to chemical exposure. Therefore, such interactions are important factors to be considered in ecological risk assessments.

langue originaleAnglais
Pages (de - à)1751-1759
Nombre de pages9
journalEnvironmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume34
Numéro de publication8
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 1 août 2015

Empreinte digitale

intraspecific interaction
Daphnia
Population dynamics
interspecific interaction
Population Dynamics
pyrene
population dynamics
Population Density
predation
Population
intraspecific competition
population structure
population density
interspecific competition
Risk assessment
Larva
population size
Linear Models
risk assessment
effect

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Viaene, Karel P J ; De Laender, Frederik ; Rico, Andreu ; Van den Brink, Paul J. ; Di Guardo, Antonio ; Morselli, Melissa ; Janssen, Colin R. / Species interactions and chemical stress: Combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene on Daphnia magna population dynamics. Dans: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. 2015 ; Vol 34, Numéro 8. p. 1751-1759.
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Species interactions and chemical stress: Combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene on Daphnia magna population dynamics. / Viaene, Karel P J; De Laender, Frederik; Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J.; Di Guardo, Antonio; Morselli, Melissa; Janssen, Colin R.

Dans: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol 34, Numéro 8, 01.08.2015, p. 1751-1759.

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

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T1 - Species interactions and chemical stress: Combined effects of intraspecific and interspecific interactions and pyrene on Daphnia magna population dynamics

AU - Viaene, Karel P J

AU - De Laender, Frederik

AU - Rico, Andreu

AU - Van den Brink, Paul J.

AU - Di Guardo, Antonio

AU - Morselli, Melissa

AU - Janssen, Colin R.

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