Sources of business cycles in a low income country

Romain Houssa, Jolan Mohimont, Christopher Otrok

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

Résumé

We examine the role of global and domestic shocks in driving macroeconomic fluctuations for Ghana. We are able to study the impact of exogenous shocks, including productivity, credit supply and commodity price shocks. We identify the shocks using a combination of sign and recursive restrictions within Bayesian vector autoregressive models. As a benchmark we provide results for South Africa to document the difference between two economies with similar structures but at different stages of development. We find that global shocks play a more dominant role in South Africa than in Ghana. These shocks operate through three channels: trade, credit and commodity prices.

langue originaleAnglais
Pages (de - à)125-148
Nombre de pages24
journalPacific Economic Review
Volume20
Numéro de publication1
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 1 févr. 2015

Empreinte digitale

business cycle
commodity price
Ghana
commodity
credit
low income
sales organization
Productivity
income
macroeconomics
fluctuation
Industry
productivity
supply
economy
Africa
Business cycles
Low-income countries
document

Citer ceci

Houssa, Romain ; Mohimont, Jolan ; Otrok, Christopher. / Sources of business cycles in a low income country. Dans: Pacific Economic Review. 2015 ; Vol 20, Numéro 1. p. 125-148.
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Sources of business cycles in a low income country. / Houssa, Romain; Mohimont, Jolan; Otrok, Christopher.

Dans: Pacific Economic Review, Vol 20, Numéro 1, 01.02.2015, p. 125-148.

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

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