Looking for a dialogue between farmers and scientific soil knowledge: Learnings from an ethno-geomorphopedological study in a Philippine’s upland village

Lola Richelle, Marjolein Visser, Laurent Bock, Peter Walpole, François Mialhe, Gilles Colinet, Nicolas Dendoncker

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

Résumé

Several ethnopedological studies highlight the plurality of soil knowledge and the complexity of soil knowledge systems. These knowledge systems are specific to social groups or communities and the dialogue between them is not easy. Local soil knowledge is often misrepresented and reduced when correspondences with soil sciences categories are established without due care. This paper results from two field studies in an upland village of Southern Philippines. The sociocultural richness and the high diversity of farming systems characterizing this local context have highlighted the importance of accounting for the diversity of soil knowledge related to local issues and sustainability. Looking for a dialogue among the plurality of perceptions, knowledge system, and typologies regarding soils implies that attention be given to knowledge construction processes. In order to facilitate an egalitarian dialogue it is also essential to explore relations between soil knowledge, farming systems, and sociocultural context. Discussion with farmers about their soils has cast doubt on the practical relevance of soil science knowledge in a context of non-industrial and non-chemical agriculture and revealed the dynamic dimension of farmers’ soil knowledge construction and the practical relevance of contextualized knowledge. In this paper, we propose methodological and epistemological thoughts to help establish a common language between scientists and farmers. We also propose to use the soil groups emerging from field characterization as a practical tool to dialogue with farmers in the field, to build a common understanding of soil heterogeneity. We consider this approach as a critical step to initiate collaborative soil studies from a practical and endogenous perspective.

langueAnglais
Pages1-26
Nombre de pages26
journalAgroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
Les DOIs
étatAccepté/sous presse - 9 juil. 2017

Empreinte digitale

Philippines
villages
highlands
farmer
village
learning
dialogue
farmers
Soils
soil
knowledge
science
soil science
farming system
typology
agriculture
sustainability
farming systems
language
soil heterogeneity

mots-clés

    Citer ceci

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    abstract = "Several ethnopedological studies highlight the plurality of soil knowledge and the complexity of soil knowledge systems. These knowledge systems are specific to social groups or communities and the dialogue between them is not easy. Local soil knowledge is often misrepresented and reduced when correspondences with soil sciences categories are established without due care. This paper results from two field studies in an upland village of Southern Philippines. The sociocultural richness and the high diversity of farming systems characterizing this local context have highlighted the importance of accounting for the diversity of soil knowledge related to local issues and sustainability. Looking for a dialogue among the plurality of perceptions, knowledge system, and typologies regarding soils implies that attention be given to knowledge construction processes. In order to facilitate an egalitarian dialogue it is also essential to explore relations between soil knowledge, farming systems, and sociocultural context. Discussion with farmers about their soils has cast doubt on the practical relevance of soil science knowledge in a context of non-industrial and non-chemical agriculture and revealed the dynamic dimension of farmers’ soil knowledge construction and the practical relevance of contextualized knowledge. In this paper, we propose methodological and epistemological thoughts to help establish a common language between scientists and farmers. We also propose to use the soil groups emerging from field characterization as a practical tool to dialogue with farmers in the field, to build a common understanding of soil heterogeneity. We consider this approach as a critical step to initiate collaborative soil studies from a practical and endogenous perspective.",
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    Looking for a dialogue between farmers and scientific soil knowledge : Learnings from an ethno-geomorphopedological study in a Philippine’s upland village. / Richelle, Lola; Visser, Marjolein; Bock, Laurent; Walpole, Peter; Mialhe, François; Colinet, Gilles; Dendoncker, Nicolas.

    Dans: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, 09.07.2017, p. 1-26.

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