Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans

Céline C. Michiels, François Darchambeau, Fleur A.E. Roland, Cédric Morana, Marc Llirós, Tamara García-Armisen, Bo Thamdrup, Alberto V. Borges, Donald E. Canfield, Pierre Servais, Jean Pierre Descy, Sean A. Crowe

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

Résumé

Nitrogen limitation during the Proterozoic has been inferred from the great expanse of ocean anoxia under low-O 2 atmospheres, which could have promoted NO 3 â ' reduction to N 2 and fixed N loss from the ocean. The deep oceans were Fe rich (ferruginous) during much of this time, yet the dynamics of N cycling under such conditions remain entirely conceptual, as analogue environments are rare today. Here we use incubation experiments to show that a modern ferruginous basin, Kabuno Bay in East Africa, supports high rates of NO 3 â ' reduction. Although 60% of this NO 3 â ' is reduced to N 2 through canonical denitrification, a large fraction (40%) is reduced to NH 4 +, leading to N retention rather than loss. We also find that NO 3 â ' reduction is Fe dependent, demonstrating that such reactions occur in natural ferruginous water columns. Numerical modelling of ferruginous upwelling systems, informed by our results from Kabuno Bay, demonstrates that NO 3 â ' reduction to NH 4 + could have enhanced biological production, fuelling sulfate reduction and the development of mid-water euxinia overlying ferruginous deep oceans. This NO 3 â ' reduction to NH 4 + could also have partly offset a negative feedback on biological production that accompanies oxygenation of the surface ocean. Our results indicate that N loss in ferruginous upwelling systems may not have kept pace with global N fixation at marine phosphorous concentrations (0.04-0.13 μM) indicated by the rock record. We therefore suggest that global marine biological production under ferruginous ocean conditions in the Proterozoic eon may thus have been P not N limited.

langueAnglais
Pages217-221
Nombre de pages5
journalNature Geoscience
Volume10
Numéro3
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 1 mars 2017

Empreinte digitale

Proterozoic
iron
biological production
nutrient
nitrogen
lake
ocean
upwelling
oxygenation
anoxia
fixation
denitrification
sea surface
water column
incubation
sulfate
atmosphere
basin
rock
modeling

Citer ceci

Michiels, C. C., Darchambeau, F., Roland, F. A. E., Morana, C., Llirós, M., García-Armisen, T., ... Crowe, S. A. (2017). Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans. Nature Geoscience, 10(3), 217-221. DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2886
Michiels, Céline C. ; Darchambeau, François ; Roland, Fleur A.E. ; Morana, Cédric ; Llirós, Marc ; García-Armisen, Tamara ; Thamdrup, Bo ; Borges, Alberto V. ; Canfield, Donald E. ; Servais, Pierre ; Descy, Jean Pierre ; Crowe, Sean A./ Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans. Dans: Nature Geoscience. 2017 ; Vol 10, Numéro 3. p. 217-221
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abstract = "Nitrogen limitation during the Proterozoic has been inferred from the great expanse of ocean anoxia under low-O 2 atmospheres, which could have promoted NO 3 {\^a} ' reduction to N 2 and fixed N loss from the ocean. The deep oceans were Fe rich (ferruginous) during much of this time, yet the dynamics of N cycling under such conditions remain entirely conceptual, as analogue environments are rare today. Here we use incubation experiments to show that a modern ferruginous basin, Kabuno Bay in East Africa, supports high rates of NO 3 {\^a} ' reduction. Although 60{\%} of this NO 3 {\^a} ' is reduced to N 2 through canonical denitrification, a large fraction (40{\%}) is reduced to NH 4 +, leading to N retention rather than loss. We also find that NO 3 {\^a} ' reduction is Fe dependent, demonstrating that such reactions occur in natural ferruginous water columns. Numerical modelling of ferruginous upwelling systems, informed by our results from Kabuno Bay, demonstrates that NO 3 {\^a} ' reduction to NH 4 + could have enhanced biological production, fuelling sulfate reduction and the development of mid-water euxinia overlying ferruginous deep oceans. This NO 3 {\^a} ' reduction to NH 4 + could also have partly offset a negative feedback on biological production that accompanies oxygenation of the surface ocean. Our results indicate that N loss in ferruginous upwelling systems may not have kept pace with global N fixation at marine phosphorous concentrations (0.04-0.13 μM) indicated by the rock record. We therefore suggest that global marine biological production under ferruginous ocean conditions in the Proterozoic eon may thus have been P not N limited.",
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Michiels, CC, Darchambeau, F, Roland, FAE, Morana, C, Llirós, M, García-Armisen, T, Thamdrup, B, Borges, AV, Canfield, DE, Servais, P, Descy, JP & Crowe, SA 2017, 'Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans' Nature Geoscience, VOL. 10, Numéro 3, p. 217-221. DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2886

Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans. / Michiels, Céline C.; Darchambeau, François; Roland, Fleur A.E.; Morana, Cédric; Llirós, Marc; García-Armisen, Tamara; Thamdrup, Bo; Borges, Alberto V.; Canfield, Donald E.; Servais, Pierre; Descy, Jean Pierre; Crowe, Sean A.

Dans: Nature Geoscience, Vol 10, Numéro 3, 01.03.2017, p. 217-221.

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

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T1 - Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans

AU - Michiels,Céline C.

AU - Darchambeau,François

AU - Roland,Fleur A.E.

AU - Morana,Cédric

AU - Llirós,Marc

AU - García-Armisen,Tamara

AU - Thamdrup,Bo

AU - Borges,Alberto V.

AU - Canfield,Donald E.

AU - Servais,Pierre

AU - Descy,Jean Pierre

AU - Crowe,Sean A.

PY - 2017/3/1

Y1 - 2017/3/1

N2 - Nitrogen limitation during the Proterozoic has been inferred from the great expanse of ocean anoxia under low-O 2 atmospheres, which could have promoted NO 3 â ' reduction to N 2 and fixed N loss from the ocean. The deep oceans were Fe rich (ferruginous) during much of this time, yet the dynamics of N cycling under such conditions remain entirely conceptual, as analogue environments are rare today. Here we use incubation experiments to show that a modern ferruginous basin, Kabuno Bay in East Africa, supports high rates of NO 3 â ' reduction. Although 60% of this NO 3 â ' is reduced to N 2 through canonical denitrification, a large fraction (40%) is reduced to NH 4 +, leading to N retention rather than loss. We also find that NO 3 â ' reduction is Fe dependent, demonstrating that such reactions occur in natural ferruginous water columns. Numerical modelling of ferruginous upwelling systems, informed by our results from Kabuno Bay, demonstrates that NO 3 â ' reduction to NH 4 + could have enhanced biological production, fuelling sulfate reduction and the development of mid-water euxinia overlying ferruginous deep oceans. This NO 3 â ' reduction to NH 4 + could also have partly offset a negative feedback on biological production that accompanies oxygenation of the surface ocean. Our results indicate that N loss in ferruginous upwelling systems may not have kept pace with global N fixation at marine phosphorous concentrations (0.04-0.13 μM) indicated by the rock record. We therefore suggest that global marine biological production under ferruginous ocean conditions in the Proterozoic eon may thus have been P not N limited.

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Michiels CC, Darchambeau F, Roland FAE, Morana C, Llirós M, García-Armisen T et al. Iron-dependent nitrogen cycling in a ferruginous lake and the nutrient status of Proterozoic oceans. Nature Geoscience. 2017 mars 1;10(3):217-221. Disponible �, DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2886