"God, I have so many ashtrays!" Dependences and dependencies in consumer-possession relationships

Résultats de recherche: Recherche - Revue par des pairsArticle

Résumé

Tourist souvenirs are a typical example of special possessions that may convey deep meanings to consumers' life. Prior studies assume that consumers have enduring and stable relationships with such possessions resulting from their role in identity construction. They tend to neglect the influence of passing time and moving spaces and fail to provide a network perspective, predominantly focusing on the consumer-possession's dyad. This research aims to bring a holistic and dynamic perspective to the relationships between consumers and their special possessions, referring to Hodder's concepts of entanglement (dependence) and entrapment (dependency). In a naturalistic interpretive perspective, we examine the three stages of the consumption cycle, namely acquisition, consumption, and disposal. The findings suggest that consumers may not only develop enduring relationships with their tourist possessions but also liquid ones, depending on whether they are in entangled or entrapped situations. Relationships are 'liquid' in the sense that they are temporary, more detached, and less special.

langueAnglais
Pages94-109
Nombre de pages16
journalJournal of Business Research
Volume69
Numéro1
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 2016

Empreinte digitale

Deity
Tourists
Neglect
Identity construction
Disposal
Interpretive
Dyads

mots-clés

    Citer ceci

    @article{a7d12fd289af4da49c526dfd414438b5,
    title = "{"}God, I have so many ashtrays!{"} Dependences and dependencies in consumer-possession relationships",
    abstract = "Tourist souvenirs are a typical example of special possessions that may convey deep meanings to consumers' life. Prior studies assume that consumers have enduring and stable relationships with such possessions resulting from their role in identity construction. They tend to neglect the influence of passing time and moving spaces and fail to provide a network perspective, predominantly focusing on the consumer-possession's dyad. This research aims to bring a holistic and dynamic perspective to the relationships between consumers and their special possessions, referring to Hodder's concepts of entanglement (dependence) and entrapment (dependency). In a naturalistic interpretive perspective, we examine the three stages of the consumption cycle, namely acquisition, consumption, and disposal. The findings suggest that consumers may not only develop enduring relationships with their tourist possessions but also liquid ones, depending on whether they are in entangled or entrapped situations. Relationships are 'liquid' in the sense that they are temporary, more detached, and less special.",
    keywords = "Consumer culture theory, Entanglement theory, Liquid relationships, Qualitative research, Special possessions",
    author = "Julie Masset and Alain Decrop",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.024",
    volume = "69",
    pages = "94--109",
    journal = "Journal of Business Research",
    issn = "0148-2963",
    publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
    number = "1",

    }

    "God, I have so many ashtrays!" Dependences and dependencies in consumer-possession relationships. / Masset, Julie; Decrop, Alain.

    Dans: Journal of Business Research, Vol 69, Numéro 1, 2016, p. 94-109.

    Résultats de recherche: Recherche - Revue par des pairsArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - "God, I have so many ashtrays!" Dependences and dependencies in consumer-possession relationships

    AU - Masset,Julie

    AU - Decrop,Alain

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Tourist souvenirs are a typical example of special possessions that may convey deep meanings to consumers' life. Prior studies assume that consumers have enduring and stable relationships with such possessions resulting from their role in identity construction. They tend to neglect the influence of passing time and moving spaces and fail to provide a network perspective, predominantly focusing on the consumer-possession's dyad. This research aims to bring a holistic and dynamic perspective to the relationships between consumers and their special possessions, referring to Hodder's concepts of entanglement (dependence) and entrapment (dependency). In a naturalistic interpretive perspective, we examine the three stages of the consumption cycle, namely acquisition, consumption, and disposal. The findings suggest that consumers may not only develop enduring relationships with their tourist possessions but also liquid ones, depending on whether they are in entangled or entrapped situations. Relationships are 'liquid' in the sense that they are temporary, more detached, and less special.

    AB - Tourist souvenirs are a typical example of special possessions that may convey deep meanings to consumers' life. Prior studies assume that consumers have enduring and stable relationships with such possessions resulting from their role in identity construction. They tend to neglect the influence of passing time and moving spaces and fail to provide a network perspective, predominantly focusing on the consumer-possession's dyad. This research aims to bring a holistic and dynamic perspective to the relationships between consumers and their special possessions, referring to Hodder's concepts of entanglement (dependence) and entrapment (dependency). In a naturalistic interpretive perspective, we examine the three stages of the consumption cycle, namely acquisition, consumption, and disposal. The findings suggest that consumers may not only develop enduring relationships with their tourist possessions but also liquid ones, depending on whether they are in entangled or entrapped situations. Relationships are 'liquid' in the sense that they are temporary, more detached, and less special.

    KW - Consumer culture theory

    KW - Entanglement theory

    KW - Liquid relationships

    KW - Qualitative research

    KW - Special possessions

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84947018513&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.024

    DO - 10.1016/j.jbusres.2015.07.024

    M3 - Article

    VL - 69

    SP - 94

    EP - 109

    JO - Journal of Business Research

    T2 - Journal of Business Research

    JF - Journal of Business Research

    SN - 0148-2963

    IS - 1

    ER -