DNA: Hardware and software of life

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

Résumé

In this introductory paper I will first go back in history and endeavor to explain in simple terms, with the support of optical diffraction experiments, just how X-ray fiber diffraction pictures lead Watson and Crick to discover the DNA double helix. Second I will present the geometrical and chemical structures of the molecule, the “hardware of life”, emphasizing in some detail the nature of the hydrogen bonding in the Watson–Crick (WC) base pairs A–T, G–C formed by the natural bases of the genetic alphabet. I will then discuss a class of twelve artificial analogues to these bases, some of which have been successfully synthesized by organic chemists by rearranging the pattern of hydrogen bonds of the base pairs. Adopting the perspective of theoretical computer science and error-coding theory, I will finally present DNA as the “software of life”, by discussing Mac Dónaill’s recent interpretation of the optimality of the natural genetic cipher as compared to other possible alphabets selected from the artificial analogues.

langue originaleAnglais
Pages (de - à)781-793
Nombre de pages13
journalJournal of Computational Electronics
Volume13
Numéro de publication4
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 1 déc. 2014

Empreinte digitale

alphabets
Diffraction
Hydrogen bonds
hardware
DNA
deoxyribonucleic acid
Hardware
Coding errors
analogs
Analogue
computer programs
Software
Coding Theory
Hydrogen Bonds
Helix
diffraction
helices
Computer science
Hydrogen
Optimality

Citer ceci

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DNA: Hardware and software of life. / Lucas, Amand.

Dans: Journal of Computational Electronics, Vol 13, Numéro 4, 01.12.2014, p. 781-793.

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

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