Comparison of different toxic effect sub-models in ecosystem modelling used for ecological effect assessments and water quality standard setting

F. De Laender, K.A.C. De Schamphelaere, P.A. Vanrolleghem, C.R. Janssen

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

Résumé

Ecosystem models, combining a food web model with a toxic effect sub-model, have been proposed to incorporate ecological interactions in ecological effect assessments. Toxic effect sub-models in different studies tend to differ in (1) the used single-species toxicity data, (2) the effects they consider, (3) the concentration-effect function used. In this paper, we constructed four ecosystem models, each with a different toxic effect sub-model, and tested their capacity to predict biomass changes, and no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) established in an experimental microcosm. For most populations, these predictions depended heavily on the type of ecosystem model. The ecosystem model with a toxic effect sub-model incorporating mortality effects using a logistic concentration-effect function made accurate predictions for most populations. Additional incorporation of sub-lethal effects did not result in better predictions. Ecosystem models using linear concentration-effect functions predict biomass decreases at concentrations that are four times lower than the observed NOECs.
langue originaleAnglais
Pages (de - à)13-23
Nombre de pages11
journalEcotoxicology and Environmental Safety
Volume69
Numéro de publication1
Les DOIs
étatPublié - 1 janv. 2008
Modification externeOui

Empreinte digitale

Poisons
Water Quality
Ecosystems
Water quality
Ecosystem
Biomass
Food Chain
Population
Linear Models
Mortality
Toxicity
Logistics

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title = "Comparison of different toxic effect sub-models in ecosystem modelling used for ecological effect assessments and water quality standard setting",
abstract = "Ecosystem models, combining a food web model with a toxic effect sub-model, have been proposed to incorporate ecological interactions in ecological effect assessments. Toxic effect sub-models in different studies tend to differ in (1) the used single-species toxicity data, (2) the effects they consider, (3) the concentration-effect function used. In this paper, we constructed four ecosystem models, each with a different toxic effect sub-model, and tested their capacity to predict biomass changes, and no observed effect concentrations (NOECs) established in an experimental microcosm. For most populations, these predictions depended heavily on the type of ecosystem model. The ecosystem model with a toxic effect sub-model incorporating mortality effects using a logistic concentration-effect function made accurate predictions for most populations. Additional incorporation of sub-lethal effects did not result in better predictions. Ecosystem models using linear concentration-effect functions predict biomass decreases at concentrations that are four times lower than the observed NOECs.",
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Comparison of different toxic effect sub-models in ecosystem modelling used for ecological effect assessments and water quality standard setting. / De Laender, F.; De Schamphelaere, K.A.C.; Vanrolleghem, P.A.; Janssen, C.R.

Dans: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, Vol 69, Numéro 1, 01.01.2008, p. 13-23.

Résultats de recherche: Contribution à un journal/une revueArticle

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AU - De Laender, F.

AU - De Schamphelaere, K.A.C.

AU - Vanrolleghem, P.A.

AU - Janssen, C.R.

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