Transmembrane (TMEM) protein family members

Poorly characterized even if essential for the metastatic process

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The majority of cancer-associated deaths are related to secondary tumor formation. This multistep process involves the migration of cancer cells to anatomically distant organs. Metastasis formation relies on cancer cell dissemination and survival in the circulatory system, as well as adaptation to the new tissue notably through genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. A large number of proteins are clearly identified to play a role in the metastatic process but the structures and modes of action of these proteins are essentially unknown or poorly described. In this review, we detail the involvement of members of the transmembrane (TMEM) protein family in the formation of metastases or in the mechanisms leading to cancer cell dissemination such as migration and extra-cellular matrix remodelling. While the phenotype associated with TMEM over or down-expression is clear, the mechanisms by which these proteins allow cancer cell spreading remain, for most of them, unclear. In parallel, the 3D structures of these proteins are presented. Moreover, we proposed that TMEM proteins could be used as prognostic markers in different types of cancers and could represent potential targets for cancer treatment. A better understanding of this heterogeneous family of poorly characterized proteins thus opens perspectives for better cancer patient care.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSeminars in cancer biology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Neoplasms
Proteins
Neoplasm Metastasis
Cardiovascular System
Epigenomics
Cell Movement
Cell Survival
Patient Care
Phenotype
Therapeutics

Cite this

@article{7b73480a4d4c4fd5869c384756c4f287,
title = "Transmembrane (TMEM) protein family members: Poorly characterized even if essential for the metastatic process",
abstract = "The majority of cancer-associated deaths are related to secondary tumor formation. This multistep process involves the migration of cancer cells to anatomically distant organs. Metastasis formation relies on cancer cell dissemination and survival in the circulatory system, as well as adaptation to the new tissue notably through genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. A large number of proteins are clearly identified to play a role in the metastatic process but the structures and modes of action of these proteins are essentially unknown or poorly described. In this review, we detail the involvement of members of the transmembrane (TMEM) protein family in the formation of metastases or in the mechanisms leading to cancer cell dissemination such as migration and extra-cellular matrix remodelling. While the phenotype associated with TMEM over or down-expression is clear, the mechanisms by which these proteins allow cancer cell spreading remain, for most of them, unclear. In parallel, the 3D structures of these proteins are presented. Moreover, we proposed that TMEM proteins could be used as prognostic markers in different types of cancers and could represent potential targets for cancer treatment. A better understanding of this heterogeneous family of poorly characterized proteins thus opens perspectives for better cancer patient care.",
author = "S{\'e}bastien Marx and {Dal Maso}, Thomas and Chen, {Jia Wei} and Marina Bury and Johan Wouters and Carine Michiels and {Le Calv{\'e}}, Benjamin",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.semcancer.2019.08.018",
language = "English",
journal = "Seminars in cancer biology",
issn = "1044-579X",
publisher = "Academic press",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Transmembrane (TMEM) protein family members

T2 - Poorly characterized even if essential for the metastatic process

AU - Marx, Sébastien

AU - Dal Maso, Thomas

AU - Chen, Jia Wei

AU - Bury, Marina

AU - Wouters, Johan

AU - Michiels, Carine

AU - Le Calvé, Benjamin

N1 - Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - The majority of cancer-associated deaths are related to secondary tumor formation. This multistep process involves the migration of cancer cells to anatomically distant organs. Metastasis formation relies on cancer cell dissemination and survival in the circulatory system, as well as adaptation to the new tissue notably through genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. A large number of proteins are clearly identified to play a role in the metastatic process but the structures and modes of action of these proteins are essentially unknown or poorly described. In this review, we detail the involvement of members of the transmembrane (TMEM) protein family in the formation of metastases or in the mechanisms leading to cancer cell dissemination such as migration and extra-cellular matrix remodelling. While the phenotype associated with TMEM over or down-expression is clear, the mechanisms by which these proteins allow cancer cell spreading remain, for most of them, unclear. In parallel, the 3D structures of these proteins are presented. Moreover, we proposed that TMEM proteins could be used as prognostic markers in different types of cancers and could represent potential targets for cancer treatment. A better understanding of this heterogeneous family of poorly characterized proteins thus opens perspectives for better cancer patient care.

AB - The majority of cancer-associated deaths are related to secondary tumor formation. This multistep process involves the migration of cancer cells to anatomically distant organs. Metastasis formation relies on cancer cell dissemination and survival in the circulatory system, as well as adaptation to the new tissue notably through genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. A large number of proteins are clearly identified to play a role in the metastatic process but the structures and modes of action of these proteins are essentially unknown or poorly described. In this review, we detail the involvement of members of the transmembrane (TMEM) protein family in the formation of metastases or in the mechanisms leading to cancer cell dissemination such as migration and extra-cellular matrix remodelling. While the phenotype associated with TMEM over or down-expression is clear, the mechanisms by which these proteins allow cancer cell spreading remain, for most of them, unclear. In parallel, the 3D structures of these proteins are presented. Moreover, we proposed that TMEM proteins could be used as prognostic markers in different types of cancers and could represent potential targets for cancer treatment. A better understanding of this heterogeneous family of poorly characterized proteins thus opens perspectives for better cancer patient care.

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U2 - 10.1016/j.semcancer.2019.08.018

DO - 10.1016/j.semcancer.2019.08.018

M3 - Review article

JO - Seminars in cancer biology

JF - Seminars in cancer biology

SN - 1044-579X

ER -