The two-component system ChvGI maintains cell envelope homeostasis in Caulobacter crescentus: ChvGI-dependent cell envelope homeostasis

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Abstract


Two-component systems (TCS) are often used by bacteria to rapidly assess and respond to environmental changes. The ChvG/ChvI (ChvGI) TCS conserved in α-proteobacteria is known for regulating expression of genes related to exopolysaccharide production, viru- lence and growth. The sensor kinase ChvG autophosphorylates upon yet unknown signals and phosphorylates the response regulator ChvI to regulate transcription. Recent studies in Caulobacter crescentus showed that chv mutants are sensitive to vancomycin treatment and fail to grow in synthetic minimal media. In this work, we identified the osmotic imbalance as the main cause of growth impairment in synthetic minimal media. We also determined the ChvI regulon and found that ChvI regulates cell envelope architecture by controlling outer membrane, peptidoglycan assembly/recycling and inner membrane proteins. In addition, we found that ChvI phosphorylation is also activated upon antibiotic treatment with vancomycin. We also challenged chv mutants with other cell envelope related stress and found that treatment with antibiotics targeting transpeptidation of peptidoglycan during cell elongation impairs growth of the mutant. Finally, we observed that the sensor kinase ChvG relo- cates from a patchy-spotty distribution to distinctive foci after transition from complex to synthetic minimal media. Interestingly, this pattern of (re)location has been described for proteins involved in cell growth control and peptidoglycan synthesis upon osmotic shock. Overall, our data support that the ChvGI TCS is mainly used to monitor and respond to osmotic imbalances and damages in the peptidoglycan layer to maintain cell envelope homeostasis.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1010465
Number of pages29
JournalPLoS Genetics
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Dec 2022

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