La première diffusion du Policraticus de Jean de Salisbury en France: l’apport du manuscrit Charleville-Mézières, BM, 151

Translated title of the contribution: The earliest diffusion of John of Salisbury's policraticus in France: The contribution of the manuscript Charleville-mézières, BM, 151

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Few medieval works have generated as much interest as the Policraticus of John of Salisbury. Written in late autumn 1159 for Thomas Becket, chancellor of King Henri II Plantagenet and future archbishop of Canterbury, the work has been abundantly studied for its political content, as a mirror for princes. If research has since nuanced this characterization, by stressing in particular the humanistic culture of the text, praising John's knowledge of the classics, few studies have been devoted to the precise diffusion of the text through the manuscript tradition. Our research has two objectives: on the one hand, to propose an overview of the first diffusion of the Policraticus in France, which was facilitated by the simultaneous stay of John of Salisbury and Thomas Becket in Champagne during the years 1164-1170; on the other hand, to understand the function and the place occupied in this diffusion by the manuscript Charleville-Mézières BM 151, which comes from the Cistercian abbey of Signy. It is presented as one of the earliest French witnesses of the Policraticus to survive and stresses the relations observed between John of Salisbury, Thomas Becket and the Cistercian Order.

Translated title of the contributionThe earliest diffusion of John of Salisbury's policraticus in France: The contribution of the manuscript Charleville-mézières, BM, 151
Original languageFrench
Pages (from-to)161-176
Number of pages16
JournalCahiers de civilisation médiévale
Volume62
Issue number246
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Book history
  • Cistercians
  • John of Salisbury
  • Policraticus
  • Thomas Becket
  • medieval libraries
  • Literary networks
  • twelfth century
  • Manuscript tradition

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The earliest diffusion of John of Salisbury's policraticus in France: The contribution of the manuscript Charleville-mézières, BM, 151'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this