Optimal wavelength for the clot waveform analysis: Determination of the best resolution with minimal interference of the reagents

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Abstract

Introduction: Clot waveform analysis (CWA), a new methodology to assess coagulation process, can be usefully applied in various clinical settings. However, its clinical use is limited mainly because of the absence of standardization. No consensus exists regarding the wavelengths at which CWA has to be performed what is crucial for the sensitivity of the CWA. Objectives: The primary aim of this study is to determine which wavelength is the most sensitive and specific for CWA. Interindividual baseline absorbance will also be assessed as the impact of reagents from the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common coagulation pathway will be determined. Methods: Plasma samples were screened at wavelengths from 280 to 700 nm to provide absorbance spectra in clotted and nonclotted plasma. The interindividual variability of baseline absorbance was obtained by screening plasma from 50 healthy individuals at 340, 635, and 671 nm. The inner-filter effect of reagents was assessed in plasma or serum when appropriate at the same wavelengths. The reagents were those commonly used for activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and dilute Russell's viper venom time. Results: Clotted plasma has higher absorbance value than nonclotted plasma (P < 0.01). The absorbance of all type of samples is higher at 340 nm than at >600 nm (P < 0.01). The interindividual variability at the different wavelengths was around 25%. However, except with the STA®-CKPrest® and STA®-NeoPTimal®, the reagents do not have a significant effect on the baseline absorbance. Conclusions: Wavelengths above 650 nm are recommended to perform CWA. Most of the commercialized reagents can be used for CWA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)316-324
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Laboratory Hematology
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

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Waveform analysis
Plasmas
Wavelength
Prothrombin Time
Coagulation
Viper Venoms
Thrombin Time
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Thromboplastin
Prothrombin
Thrombin
Standardization
Screening
Serum

Cite this

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title = "Optimal wavelength for the clot waveform analysis: Determination of the best resolution with minimal interference of the reagents",
abstract = "Introduction: Clot waveform analysis (CWA), a new methodology to assess coagulation process, can be usefully applied in various clinical settings. However, its clinical use is limited mainly because of the absence of standardization. No consensus exists regarding the wavelengths at which CWA has to be performed what is crucial for the sensitivity of the CWA. Objectives: The primary aim of this study is to determine which wavelength is the most sensitive and specific for CWA. Interindividual baseline absorbance will also be assessed as the impact of reagents from the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common coagulation pathway will be determined. Methods: Plasma samples were screened at wavelengths from 280 to 700 nm to provide absorbance spectra in clotted and nonclotted plasma. The interindividual variability of baseline absorbance was obtained by screening plasma from 50 healthy individuals at 340, 635, and 671 nm. The inner-filter effect of reagents was assessed in plasma or serum when appropriate at the same wavelengths. The reagents were those commonly used for activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and dilute Russell's viper venom time. Results: Clotted plasma has higher absorbance value than nonclotted plasma (P < 0.01). The absorbance of all type of samples is higher at 340 nm than at >600 nm (P < 0.01). The interindividual variability at the different wavelengths was around 25{\%}. However, except with the STA{\circledR}-CKPrest{\circledR} and STA{\circledR}-NeoPTimal{\circledR}, the reagents do not have a significant effect on the baseline absorbance. Conclusions: Wavelengths above 650 nm are recommended to perform CWA. Most of the commercialized reagents can be used for CWA.",
author = "Jonathan Evrard and Romain Siriez and Laure Morimont and Pauline Th{\'e}mans and Julie Laloy and C{\'e}line Bouvy and Damien Gheldof and Fran{\cc}ois Mullier and Dogn{\'e}, {Jean Michel} and Jonathan Douxfils",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ijlh.12975",
language = "English",
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pages = "316--324",
journal = "International Journal of Laboratory Hematology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimal wavelength for the clot waveform analysis

T2 - Determination of the best resolution with minimal interference of the reagents

AU - Evrard, Jonathan

AU - Siriez, Romain

AU - Morimont, Laure

AU - Thémans, Pauline

AU - Laloy, Julie

AU - Bouvy, Céline

AU - Gheldof, Damien

AU - Mullier, François

AU - Dogné, Jean Michel

AU - Douxfils, Jonathan

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Introduction: Clot waveform analysis (CWA), a new methodology to assess coagulation process, can be usefully applied in various clinical settings. However, its clinical use is limited mainly because of the absence of standardization. No consensus exists regarding the wavelengths at which CWA has to be performed what is crucial for the sensitivity of the CWA. Objectives: The primary aim of this study is to determine which wavelength is the most sensitive and specific for CWA. Interindividual baseline absorbance will also be assessed as the impact of reagents from the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common coagulation pathway will be determined. Methods: Plasma samples were screened at wavelengths from 280 to 700 nm to provide absorbance spectra in clotted and nonclotted plasma. The interindividual variability of baseline absorbance was obtained by screening plasma from 50 healthy individuals at 340, 635, and 671 nm. The inner-filter effect of reagents was assessed in plasma or serum when appropriate at the same wavelengths. The reagents were those commonly used for activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and dilute Russell's viper venom time. Results: Clotted plasma has higher absorbance value than nonclotted plasma (P < 0.01). The absorbance of all type of samples is higher at 340 nm than at >600 nm (P < 0.01). The interindividual variability at the different wavelengths was around 25%. However, except with the STA®-CKPrest® and STA®-NeoPTimal®, the reagents do not have a significant effect on the baseline absorbance. Conclusions: Wavelengths above 650 nm are recommended to perform CWA. Most of the commercialized reagents can be used for CWA.

AB - Introduction: Clot waveform analysis (CWA), a new methodology to assess coagulation process, can be usefully applied in various clinical settings. However, its clinical use is limited mainly because of the absence of standardization. No consensus exists regarding the wavelengths at which CWA has to be performed what is crucial for the sensitivity of the CWA. Objectives: The primary aim of this study is to determine which wavelength is the most sensitive and specific for CWA. Interindividual baseline absorbance will also be assessed as the impact of reagents from the intrinsic, extrinsic, and common coagulation pathway will be determined. Methods: Plasma samples were screened at wavelengths from 280 to 700 nm to provide absorbance spectra in clotted and nonclotted plasma. The interindividual variability of baseline absorbance was obtained by screening plasma from 50 healthy individuals at 340, 635, and 671 nm. The inner-filter effect of reagents was assessed in plasma or serum when appropriate at the same wavelengths. The reagents were those commonly used for activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and dilute Russell's viper venom time. Results: Clotted plasma has higher absorbance value than nonclotted plasma (P < 0.01). The absorbance of all type of samples is higher at 340 nm than at >600 nm (P < 0.01). The interindividual variability at the different wavelengths was around 25%. However, except with the STA®-CKPrest® and STA®-NeoPTimal®, the reagents do not have a significant effect on the baseline absorbance. Conclusions: Wavelengths above 650 nm are recommended to perform CWA. Most of the commercialized reagents can be used for CWA.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061228679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/ijlh.12975

DO - 10.1111/ijlh.12975

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85061228679

VL - 41

SP - 316

EP - 324

JO - International Journal of Laboratory Hematology

JF - International Journal of Laboratory Hematology

SN - 1751-553X

IS - 3

ER -