Number, Age Composition and School Achievements of Siblings in Two African Capital Cities

Mathias Kuepie, Michel Tenikue, Samuel Nouetagni, Nicaise Misangumukini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper uses biographical data from Dakar and Yaoundé, two large African cities, to study the link between number of siblings and school attainment. The data describe all fertility events experienced by parents and the number of siblings of each child over time. The average family size effect is estimated first. The family size effect at different ages is then estimated. The results show that, in Dakar, both the overall and age-specific effect of family size on education are negative and statistically significant. In Yaoundé, the overall effect is not significant, but negative effects at some schooling ages (between 14 and 17) are observed in this study. Finally, the negative impact of family size on school achievement seems to be driven more by elder siblings than by younger ones.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)534-552
Number of pages19
JournalOxford Development Studies
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

capital city
age structure
family size
size effect
school
education
fertility
parents
family
event
effect

Cite this

Kuepie, Mathias ; Tenikue, Michel ; Nouetagni, Samuel ; Misangumukini, Nicaise. / Number, Age Composition and School Achievements of Siblings in Two African Capital Cities. In: Oxford Development Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 534-552.
@article{accae22d08824a228ed203ee752bd692,
title = "Number, Age Composition and School Achievements of Siblings in Two African Capital Cities",
abstract = "This paper uses biographical data from Dakar and Yaound{\'e}, two large African cities, to study the link between number of siblings and school attainment. The data describe all fertility events experienced by parents and the number of siblings of each child over time. The average family size effect is estimated first. The family size effect at different ages is then estimated. The results show that, in Dakar, both the overall and age-specific effect of family size on education are negative and statistically significant. In Yaound{\'e}, the overall effect is not significant, but negative effects at some schooling ages (between 14 and 17) are observed in this study. Finally, the negative impact of family size on school achievement seems to be driven more by elder siblings than by younger ones.",
author = "Mathias Kuepie and Michel Tenikue and Samuel Nouetagni and Nicaise Misangumukini",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1080/13600818.2014.902046",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "534--552",
journal = "Oxford Development Studies",
issn = "1360-0818",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

Number, Age Composition and School Achievements of Siblings in Two African Capital Cities. / Kuepie, Mathias; Tenikue, Michel; Nouetagni, Samuel; Misangumukini, Nicaise.

In: Oxford Development Studies, Vol. 42, No. 4, 2014, p. 534-552.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Number, Age Composition and School Achievements of Siblings in Two African Capital Cities

AU - Kuepie, Mathias

AU - Tenikue, Michel

AU - Nouetagni, Samuel

AU - Misangumukini, Nicaise

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - This paper uses biographical data from Dakar and Yaoundé, two large African cities, to study the link between number of siblings and school attainment. The data describe all fertility events experienced by parents and the number of siblings of each child over time. The average family size effect is estimated first. The family size effect at different ages is then estimated. The results show that, in Dakar, both the overall and age-specific effect of family size on education are negative and statistically significant. In Yaoundé, the overall effect is not significant, but negative effects at some schooling ages (between 14 and 17) are observed in this study. Finally, the negative impact of family size on school achievement seems to be driven more by elder siblings than by younger ones.

AB - This paper uses biographical data from Dakar and Yaoundé, two large African cities, to study the link between number of siblings and school attainment. The data describe all fertility events experienced by parents and the number of siblings of each child over time. The average family size effect is estimated first. The family size effect at different ages is then estimated. The results show that, in Dakar, both the overall and age-specific effect of family size on education are negative and statistically significant. In Yaoundé, the overall effect is not significant, but negative effects at some schooling ages (between 14 and 17) are observed in this study. Finally, the negative impact of family size on school achievement seems to be driven more by elder siblings than by younger ones.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84918769178&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/13600818.2014.902046

DO - 10.1080/13600818.2014.902046

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84918769178

VL - 42

SP - 534

EP - 552

JO - Oxford Development Studies

JF - Oxford Development Studies

SN - 1360-0818

IS - 4

ER -