Multidisciplinary management of chronic tinnitus in audiophonology centre: Survey of psychiatric comorbidities and psychotropic medications use over 10 years of activity

Thomas Dubois, Nicolas Zdanowicz, Pierre Garin, Chantal Gilain, Denis Jacques

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The multidisciplinary management of disabling chronic tinnitus in the audiophonology centre demonstrates its relevance. The detection and treatment of overlapping psychiatric pathologies is a crucial issue in the work of liaison psychiatry. Subjects and methods: A 10-year retrospective review of the activities of a university audiophonology centre with 166 patients who consulted for disabling chronic tinnitus and who underwent a Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The diagnostic criteria used were those of the DSM IV. Results: Our sample shows that major depressive disorders, somatoform disorders and sleep disorders were the most frequently encountered. Alcohol misuse was also seen as the most common substance-related disorder. Thirty (30%) had prior psychiatric or psychological monitoring, and 60% were previously treated with at least one psychotropic drug. Conclusion: The systematic approach of liaison psychiatry appears to be essential in the treatment of disabling chronic tinnitus, given the associated psychiatric comorbidity. Beyond the detection of unrecognized or untreated disorders, patient education to attentional mechanisms and hypervigilance, which reinforce an unpleasant perception of tinnitus, as well as the management of stress and somatizations and sleep hygiene, is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S29-S32
JournalPsychiatria Danubina
Volume32
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Liaison psychiatry
  • Psychiatric comorbidities
  • Psychotropic drugs
  • Tinnitus

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