Host following of an ant associate during nest relocation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Ant nests are relatively stable and long-lasting microhabitats that attract a diverse group of arthropods. Particular stressors, however, can trigger ants to relocate their nest to a new site. It is unclear how associated arthropods respond to occasional nest moving of their host. Here, I report field observations which showed that the potentially parasitic larvae of the beetle Clytra quadripunctata follow their red wood ant host during nest relocation, either by crawling on their own or by being carried by the host workers. These observations shed new light on the spatial dynamics between ants and their associates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-332
Number of pages4
JournalInsectes Sociaux
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2019

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relocation
ant
nest
Formicidae
nests
arthropods
arthropod
ant nests
microhabitats
insect larvae
microhabitat
beetle
larva

Keywords

  • Chrysomelidae
  • Dispersal
  • Formicidae
  • Host-parasite coevolution
  • Myrmecophile
  • Symbiont

Cite this

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Host following of an ant associate during nest relocation. / Parmentier, T.

In: Insectes Sociaux, Vol. 66, No. 2, 01.05.2019, p. 329-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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