Effect of stocking density on the dynamics of cannibalism in sibling larvae of Perca fluviatilis under controlled conditions

E. Baras, C. Mélard, P. Kestemont

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The effect of stocking density (10, 31.6 and 100 larvae 1; three replicates per treatment) on the day-by-day dynamics of survival, growth and cannibalism was examined in sibling perch larvae reared from eyed-egg stage in 100-1 cages (16L:8D, 20.0 ± 0.5°C, O ≥ 6.0 mg 1; feeding in excess with live Artemia nauplii during the photophase) during the first 3 weeks of exogenous feeding. Larvae unable to achieve the transition to exogenous feeding died in between 7 and 11 days post-hatch. Later, mortality from causes other than cannibalism never exceeded 1% day. Cannibalism did not start before days 10-11 and first consisted in the incomplete ingestion of prey attacked tail first, exclusively. This type of cannibalism never caused losses higher than 2.0% of the initial stock, and ceased after days 16-18. From days 12-14 onwards, differential growth was apparent, and cannibals turned to complete cannibalism of small prey ingested head first, which caused greater losses (28-53% of the stock). Increasing the stocking density did not compromise growth and decreased the overall impact of cannibalism through several complementary mechanisms: (i) a postponed emergence of cannibalism, (ii) a lower proportion of cannibals in the population, and (iii) probably a lower rate of cannibalism per capita as predation was complicated and less directed at high stocking density.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)241-255
Number of pages15
JournalAquaculture
Volume219
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2003

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