Brucella melitensis MucR, an orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, is involved in resistance to oxidative, detergent, and saline stresses and cell envelope modifications

A. Mirabella, M. Terwagne, M. S. Zygmunt, A. Cloeckaert, X. De Bolle, J. J. Letesson

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Abstract

Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for d in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents).Weshow that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts. © 2013, American Society for Microbiology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-465
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Bacteriology
Volume195
Issue number3
Early online date16 Nov 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

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Brucella melitensis
Sinorhizobium meliloti
Detergents
Alphaproteobacteria
Lipid A
Brucella
Surface Properties
Microbiology
Virulence
Life Style
Oxidative Stress
Staining and Labeling
Bacteria
Gene Expression
Peptides
Infection

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title = "Brucella melitensis MucR, an orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, is involved in resistance to oxidative, detergent, and saline stresses and cell envelope modifications",
abstract = "Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for d in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents).Weshow that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts. {\circledC} 2013, American Society for Microbiology.",
author = "A. Mirabella and M. Terwagne and Zygmunt, {M. S.} and A. Cloeckaert and {De Bolle}, X. and Letesson, {J. J.}",
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T1 - Brucella melitensis MucR, an orthologue of Sinorhizobium meliloti MucR, is involved in resistance to oxidative, detergent, and saline stresses and cell envelope modifications

AU - Mirabella, A.

AU - Terwagne, M.

AU - Zygmunt, M. S.

AU - Cloeckaert, A.

AU - De Bolle, X.

AU - Letesson, J. J.

PY - 2013/2/1

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N2 - Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for d in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents).Weshow that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts. © 2013, American Society for Microbiology.

AB - Brucella spp. and Sinorhizobium meliloti are alphaproteobacteria that share not only an intracellular lifestyle in their respective hosts, but also a crucial requirement for d in cellular and mouse infections at early time points. MucR modulates the surface properties of the bacteria and their resistance to environmental stresses (i.e., oxidative stress, cationic peptide, and detergents).Weshow that B. melitensis mucR is a functional orthologue of S. meliloti mucR, because it was able to restore the production of succinoglycan in an S. meliloti mucR mutant, as detected by calcofluor staining. Similar to S. meliloti MucR, B. melitensis MucR also represses its own transcription and flagellar gene expression via the flagellar master regulator ftcR. More surprisingly, we demonstrate that MucR regulates a lipid A core modification in B. melitensis. These changes could account for the attenuated virulence of a mucR mutant. These data reinforce the idea that there is a common conserved circuitry between plant symbionts and animal pathogens that regulates the relationship they have with their hosts. © 2013, American Society for Microbiology.

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