Are Stakeholders the Only Source of Information for Requirements Engineers? Toward a Taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Requirements elicitation consists in collecting and documenting information about the requirements from a system-to-be, and about the environment of that system. Elicitation forms a critical step in the design of any information system, subject to many challenges like information incompleteness, variability or ambiguity. To deal with these challenges, requirements engineers heavily rely on stakeholders, who turn out to be one of the most significant provider of information during elicitation. Sometimes, this comes at the cost of lesser attention being paid by engineers to other sources of information accessible in a business. In this paper, we try to deal with this issue by studying the different sources of information that can be used by engineers when designing a system. We propose TELIS, a taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources, which can be used during elicitation to review more systematically the sources of information about a system-to-be. TELIS was produced through a series of empirical studies, and was partially validated through a real-world case study. Our objective in this paper is to increase the awareness of engineers about the other information providers within a business. Ultimately, we believe our taxonomy may help in better dealing with classical elicitation challenges, and increase the chances of successful information systems design.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages28
JournalACM Transactions on Management Information Systems
Volume7
Issue number2
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 30 Jun 2016

Cite this

@article{1d5392dfcde4470487adaf3a12b9bb47,
title = "Are Stakeholders the Only Source of Information for Requirements Engineers? Toward a Taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources",
abstract = "Requirements elicitation consists in collecting and documenting information about the requirements from a system-to-be, and about the environment of that system. Elicitation forms a critical step in the design of any information system, subject to many challenges like information incompleteness, variability or ambiguity. To deal with these challenges, requirements engineers heavily rely on stakeholders, who turn out to be one of the most significant provider of information during elicitation. Sometimes, this comes at the cost of lesser attention being paid by engineers to other sources of information accessible in a business. In this paper, we try to deal with this issue by studying the different sources of information that can be used by engineers when designing a system. We propose TELIS, a taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources, which can be used during elicitation to review more systematically the sources of information about a system-to-be. TELIS was produced through a series of empirical studies, and was partially validated through a real-world case study. Our objective in this paper is to increase the awareness of engineers about the other information providers within a business. Ultimately, we believe our taxonomy may help in better dealing with classical elicitation challenges, and increase the chances of successful information systems design.",
keywords = "Requirements Engineering, Elicitation, Information Sources, Empirical Study, Exploratory Research",
author = "Corentin Burnay",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "30",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
journal = "ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems",
issn = "2158-656X",
publisher = "ACM Press",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are Stakeholders the Only Source of Information for Requirements Engineers? Toward a Taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources

AU - Burnay, Corentin

PY - 2016/6/30

Y1 - 2016/6/30

N2 - Requirements elicitation consists in collecting and documenting information about the requirements from a system-to-be, and about the environment of that system. Elicitation forms a critical step in the design of any information system, subject to many challenges like information incompleteness, variability or ambiguity. To deal with these challenges, requirements engineers heavily rely on stakeholders, who turn out to be one of the most significant provider of information during elicitation. Sometimes, this comes at the cost of lesser attention being paid by engineers to other sources of information accessible in a business. In this paper, we try to deal with this issue by studying the different sources of information that can be used by engineers when designing a system. We propose TELIS, a taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources, which can be used during elicitation to review more systematically the sources of information about a system-to-be. TELIS was produced through a series of empirical studies, and was partially validated through a real-world case study. Our objective in this paper is to increase the awareness of engineers about the other information providers within a business. Ultimately, we believe our taxonomy may help in better dealing with classical elicitation challenges, and increase the chances of successful information systems design.

AB - Requirements elicitation consists in collecting and documenting information about the requirements from a system-to-be, and about the environment of that system. Elicitation forms a critical step in the design of any information system, subject to many challenges like information incompleteness, variability or ambiguity. To deal with these challenges, requirements engineers heavily rely on stakeholders, who turn out to be one of the most significant provider of information during elicitation. Sometimes, this comes at the cost of lesser attention being paid by engineers to other sources of information accessible in a business. In this paper, we try to deal with this issue by studying the different sources of information that can be used by engineers when designing a system. We propose TELIS, a taxonomy of Elicitation Information Sources, which can be used during elicitation to review more systematically the sources of information about a system-to-be. TELIS was produced through a series of empirical studies, and was partially validated through a real-world case study. Our objective in this paper is to increase the awareness of engineers about the other information providers within a business. Ultimately, we believe our taxonomy may help in better dealing with classical elicitation challenges, and increase the chances of successful information systems design.

KW - Requirements Engineering

KW - Elicitation

KW - Information Sources

KW - Empirical Study

KW - Exploratory Research

M3 - Article

VL - 7

JO - ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems

JF - ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems

SN - 2158-656X

IS - 2

ER -